Newsflash: Recent house property tax valuation, home is smaller than county records, appeal?

I purchased my property last year and through a series of contractors giving estimates on flooring, I’ve discovered that my basement is not the size of the main upstairs living area. Thus, it could be around 300-500 square feet smaller than what the county has on file, which is 2000 square feet. One contractor mentioned that whoever did the house measurement on file just measured it from the outside and doubled it without going down to the basement. Also, it appears that my attached, covered deck is included in the sq ft.My question: should I dispute the tax valuation, and file a “Factual Error Appeal”? Will this be worth whatever the hassle is (such as getting a remeasurement done, possibly paying for that) to save money from the tax guy? FYI, my recent property valuation shot up $40K since last year.

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93gbqp/recent_house_property_tax_valuation_home_is/?utm_source=ifttt

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Newsflash: should I buy a house with a sliced off family room

Throwaway because I want to share this post with friends.First time homebuyer, looking to buy a home in a relatively weaker, smaller housing market in Virginia. The home me and the Mrs. have settled on, is yet to be built but we like the model and a similar home that was recently built that we have extensively walked through.Now, here is the catch. Our home will be build with the main wall of the family room sliced off significantly (picture below). This leaves us with a diagonal family room wall without a fireplace.Should we do this? Have you seen anything similar? Will this home resell? Note: We are getting about a 10% discount over other similar homes, and we are making the diagonal wall a wall of windows.https://imgur.com/a/x5XhJ3i

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93fxdo/should_i_buy_a_house_with_a_sliced_off_family_room/?utm_source=ifttt

Newsflash: Hey guys, lien questions here.

New buyer here from Lawrence, Ky, so forgive my lack of what is probably obvious information. How far back should I go on a lien search, attorneys in my area charge a base plus for how far back they go. Now should I go back as far as possible? Or just an X amount of years? Again, sorry for what is probably obvious. There are no realtors involved, just buying from someone who inherited the place.

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93gbb4/hey_guys_lien_questions_here/?utm_source=ifttt

Newsflash: Does commercial landlord in CA need a real estate license?

I will check with the Department of Real Estate, but my company has a few commercial tenants, so I’m not sure if a real estate license is required. The law is a little hard to navigate on this.

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93frrt/does_commercial_landlord_in_ca_need_a_real_estate/?utm_source=ifttt

Newsflash: New York Well Testing question

I have a friend who recently was closing on a house in New York. They had a water test done, where it was disclosed that there were above normal levels for certain contaminants. I believe New York has a law in place that requires potable water to be in place prior to the sale of a home with a well. I did some research and saw the below PDF (it’s over ten years old, so not sure if there is something more recent/changed).http://www.dolgettalaw.com/pdf/2007-10-well-testing.pdf”If the test fails any of the primary parameters (bacteria/total coliform or e-coli, nitrates, arsenic, lead, primary organic contaminants, vinyl chloride or MTBE) the seller will have a choice to a) correct the condition to achieve safe levels of contaminants b) cancel the contract of sale and return the down payment or c) agree in writing to consummate the sale upon terms negotiated between the buyer and the seller.”In the initial discussion, it was not made aware to the buyer that this was a law in NY, and verbally it was discussed that they would eat the costs associated (prior to the closing). This was never signed off in writing. The realtor of the seller is now saying that due to waived rights, unless the buyer agrees to sign an addendum, the seller will keep the deposit and the sale will not go through.I’m pretty sure unless it is agreed upon in writing, the last part is a scare tactic/illegal. My friend is lawyering up now, so that base is covered. The real estate agent for my friend (buyer) obviously screwed up big time here.Is there any advice moving forward outside of the obvious lawyer route?

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93fxdw/new_york_well_testing_question/?utm_source=ifttt

Newsflash: Considering going into real estate but have no idea where to start.

Yeah so the title pretty much sums up what I’m about to say. I’m only 17 years old at the time of typing this but I’m considering going into real estate. I know this is probably not the best place to ask for advice for this but here it goes. I would like to go solo but I know that solo is difficult especially for an agent fresh out of highschool, but I’m also willing to work as a team to learn the ropes before going on my own. My question is where’s a good place to start and is there much I can do as a junior in highschool to prepare myself for this career before I’m out on my own in adulthood.

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93cdmp/considering_going_into_real_estate_but_have_no/?utm_source=ifttt

Newsflash: Boundary dispute

When two neighbors are arguing over a boundary line, what is the best course to formally resolve the issue?Is there a public resource, or is this a private matter.Is there some group that specializes in marking the line? What is the typical cost? We’re talking space between two single family houses.

Read more at https://www.reddit.com/r/RealEstate/comments/93etg4/boundary_dispute/?utm_source=ifttt